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floatingdownrivers:

Guess whose back

Back again

PLUTOS BACK

TELL A FRIEND

Shoot Pluto was always a planet to me.

jcoleknowsbest:

neoamericana:

nezua:

asustainablefuture:

A Selk’nam couple with their baby, on a ship en route to be exhibited in Europe as “wildmen”. The Selk’nam people are an indigenous tribe in the Patagonian region of Southern Argentina and Chile. Both appear to have slight damage on their ankles from cruel, probably iron, restraints. 
The fear and confusion on their face is haunting. For people who had lived a simple hunting and gathering lifestyle, with little European interaction, the rest of their lives must’ve seemed like a surreal nightmare. 

White History

Abducted by aliens.

Smh

jcoleknowsbest:

neoamericana:

nezua:

asustainablefuture:

A Selk’nam couple with their baby, on a ship en route to be exhibited in Europe as “wildmen”. The Selk’nam people are an indigenous tribe in the Patagonian region of Southern Argentina and Chile. Both appear to have slight damage on their ankles from cruel, probably iron, restraints.

The fear and confusion on their face is haunting. For people who had lived a simple hunting and gathering lifestyle, with little European interaction, the rest of their lives must’ve seemed like a surreal nightmare. 

White History

Abducted by aliens.

Smh

Source: asustainablefuture

madamvastras:

image  image  image  image

"the caretaker" color palette

Source: madamvastras

brown-princess:

September was so fast..
Good Morning!

brown-princess:

September was so fast..

Good Morning!

Source: prettyanddreammy

gelopanda:

breezebloops:

Bomba is an Afro-Puerto Rican folkloric music style developed throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries by west African slaves brought to the island by the Spanish. It is a communal activity that still thrives in its traditional centers of Loíza, Santurce, Mayagüez, Ponce, and New York City. The traditional musical style has been diffused throughout the United States following the Puerto Rican Diaspora, especially in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, California, and Florida. It also became increasingly popular in Peru, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil, and has largely influenced Afro-Latino music styles within these countries.

More than just a genre of music, it’s most defining characteristic is the encounter and creative relationship between dancers, percussionists, and singers. Dance is an integral part of the music. It is popularly described as a challenge/connection, or an art of “call and answer,” in which two or more drums follow the rhythms and moves of the dancers. The challenge requires great physical shape and usually continues until either the drummer or the dancer discontinues.

There are several styles of bomba, and the popularity of these styles varies by region. There are three basic rhythms, as well as many others that are mainly variations of these: Yubá, Sicá and Holandés. Other styles include Cuembé, Bámbula, Cocobalé, and Hoyomula.

❤️❤️❤️❤️ mi gente

Source: breezebloops

lilcochina:

Yet ppl don’t understand how white privilege still exists in brown n black countries

lilcochina:

Yet ppl don’t understand how white privilege still exists in brown n black countries

Tagged: colonizationcolonialismwhite privilegeEuropean

Source: vox.com

angrynaps:

kemetic-dreams:

Hi

#I did learn that in my history books#but then I’m not American#also#this may come as a shock to some of you#but the Wright brothers were NOT the pioneers of flight eitherare you referring to Alberto Santos-Dumont? cause i definitely had NO idea about him until a school trip during my exchange in brazil took us to his old house /museum

angrynaps:

kemetic-dreams:

Hi

#I did learn that in my history books#but then I’m not American#also#this may come as a shock to some of you#but the Wright brothers were NOT the pioneers of flight either


are you referring to Alberto Santos-Dumont? cause i definitely had NO idea about him until a school trip during my exchange in brazil took us to his old house /museum

BREAKING: 11 Things You Need To Know About The Ebola Epidemic That's Killing Thousands In Africa [TW: Graphic Content] →

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Updated — Sept. 30, 10:30 p.m. ET

A medical worker walks past the crematorium where victims of Ebola are burned in Monrovia, Liberia, on Sept. 29. PASCAL GUYOT/AFP / Getty Images

As a deadly Ebola epidemic spreads across western Africa, world leaders are scrambling to find solutions. Here’s what you need to know about the disease and the havoc it is wreaking:

1. Ebola is primarily ravaging the west African nations of Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, and Senegal.


Authorities in these nations have scrambled to contain the disease. In Sierra Leone, the government quarantined a third of the entire population — about 2 million people — in an effort to fight the disease. The quarantine came after Sierra Leone had previously declared a state of emergency and deployed troops to clinics.

In Nigeria, President Goodluck Jonathan declared a state of emergency over Ebola on Aug. 8. Jonathan also approved the release of 1.9 billion naira ($11.7 million) to contain the disease through an intervention plan.

By Sept. 30, the Ebola outbreak in Nigeria appeared to be contained, according to the CDC. The situation in Senegal was “stable” at the end of September, the World Health Organization reported.

Liberia hasn’t been so successful; President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf declared a state of emergency Aug. 6, but by the end of September experts warned that the disease had nevertheless taken the country to the brink of complete meltdown.

The CDC had a standing warning through September against nonessential travel to the affected countries. The U.S. Peace Corps also evacuated hundreds of its volunteers in affected countries.

A separate, unrelated, outbreak of Ebola has also appeared in Congo.

CDC / Via cdc.gov

2. The disease has spread to the United States.


Ebola arrived in the U.S. in late September. According to CDC Director Thomas Frieden, a man in Dallas began showing symptoms several days after arriving in the U.S. on Sept. 20.

“This is the first patient diagnosed outside of Africa with this strain of Ebola,” Frieden said at a news conference on Sept. 30.

While the man is the first to be diagnosed in the U.S., several other Americans contracted the disease in Africa. Missionary Nancy Writebol and Dr. Kent Brantlywere both returned to the U.S. after falling ill in July. They had recovered by late August. American aid worker Richard Sacra also contradicted the disease and was evacuated to the U.S. He was discharged from a Nebraska hospital in September.

Ebola patients have been evacuated to other countries as well. In August, a Spanish missionary and a British healthcare worker were both evacuated to their respective countries. The Spanish missionary later died from the disease.

AP Photo/Nati Harnik

AP Photo/Bob Leverone

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

 

The three Americans who have contracted and survived Ebola: Richard Sacra, left, Nancy Writebol, center, and Kent Brantly, right.

3. By the end of September, the Ebola epidemic hadkilled 3,091 people.


Accounting for all confirmed, probable, and suspected deaths, the count has grownfrom 330 people in late June to 3,091 by the end of September.

The total number of cases also continues to rise, with 6,575 confirmed, probable, and suspected infections so far. The World Health Organization warned that those numbers could “climb exponentially” to 20,000 cases by November. As many as 1.4 million people may have contracted the disease by January.

A woman and her children wait outside a new Ebola treatment center run by Doctors Without Borders. John Moore / Getty Images

4. The Ebola epidemic has been growing in west Africa since last year.


WHO began reporting on the epidemic in March, and initial estimates indicated the outbreak began in early 2014. However, subsequent investigation traced the likely origins of the epidemic back even further, to a 2-year-old child who died in Guinea on Dec. 6, 2013. Investigators believe a health care worker then became infected and carried the disease to other parts of the country.

The World Health Organization says the outbreak is a “public health emergency of international concern.”

Nowa Paye, 9, is taken to an ambulance after showing signs of Ebola in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia on Sept. 30. AP Photo/Jerome Delay

5. This is the worst outbreak of Ebola in the history of the disease.


The current epidemic has both killed more people than any previous Ebola outbreak, and spread to more countries.

“The outbreak is by far the largest ever in the nearly four-decade history of this disease,” Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organization said.

Ebola is a relatively new disease; it was first identified in 1976 near the Ebola Riverin what was then Zaire (and today is the Democratic Republic of Congo). The first patient in 1976 was a 44-year-old man who was originally believed to have malaria. When scientists realized they were dealing with a new disease they named it after the nearby river.

There have been other outbreaks since — including significant ones in 1995, 2000, 2003, and 2007 — but none that have claimed as many lives as the current one.

The current epidemic also has killed at least 208 healthcare workers, more than any previous Ebola outbreak.

The ongoing epidemic has been exacerbated by several factors: geography and distances; movement of both people and bodies; weak health care infrastructure in affected countries; health care workers who lack experience with Ebola; and communities that do not understand the disease and don’t want to cooperate with health officials.

Medical workers carry the corpse of an Ebola victim in Monrovia on Sept. 29. PASCAL GUYOT/AFP / Getty Images

6. The disease is extraordinarily deadly and can kill most of the people who become infected.


During the first Ebola epidemic in 1976, the disease killed 88% of the people who became infected. According to WHO, subsequent fatality rates have ranged from 25% to 90%.

At present, the fatality rate from this outbreak is just below 50%.

There are five different species of Ebola, three of which have been seen in Africa. The ongoing epidemic involves the Zaire Ebola virus, which is the most deadly subtype.

Residents of Monrovia take a man suspected of carrying the Ebola virus to a clinic on Sept. 28. AP Photo/Jerome Delay

5. There is no licensed cure or vaccine for Ebola.


For-profit drug companies historically paid little attention to Ebola, but scientists are now working feverishly on ways to fight the disease.

In the United Kingdom, volunteers are already receiving a vaccine made by GlaxoSmithKline, a British drug manufacturer.

In the U.S., San Diego-based drug manufacturer Mapp Biopharmaceutical is making ZMapp, an experimental serum that was given to the American aid workers whowho contracted the disease in Liberia.

Canadian company Tekmira also is working on a drug called TKM-Ebola, which has been fast-tracked by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The U.S. Department of Defense is partially funding the development of TKM-Ebola.

For now, however, “raising awareness” is the primary way to fight the spread of the disease, according to WHO. Treating those who have become infected involves using IVs to balance “the patient’s fluids and electrolytes” among other things,according to the Centers for Disease Control. The CDC also emphasizes the use of preventative measures such isolating those who are infected and having health care workers use goggles, masks, and other protective clothing.

A Doctors Without Borders worker sprays a colleague’s boots with chlorine disinfectant at a facility in Monrovia on Sept. 29. Stringer / Reuters

6. Ebola is a brutal disease that causes everything from nausea to bleeding from all of the body’s orifices.


The first symptoms of Ebola include the sudden onset of fever, weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, and other things. As the disease progresses, it can cause kidney and liver failure. Symptoms typically start showing up between 8 and 10 days after exposure, though the can appear sooner or later.

Ebola can also cause bleeding from the eyes, ears, nose, mouth, and rectum. And it can produce swelling in the eyes and genitals, among other things.

WARNING

This image is graphic

Click to reveal

World Health Organization / YouTube / Via youtube.com

7. The disease spreads via bodily fluids.


Ebola is not an airborne disease.

Instead, it spreads either from animals to humans, or from humans to humans. In either case, it spreads via bodily fluids. Most bodily fluids — blood, mucus, semen, saliva, etc. — can spread Ebola, as can objects and surfaces that are contaminated with infected secretions. Due to the way the virus spreads, health care workers are among the most susceptible groups of people.

People have also picked up Ebola after handling the bodies of those who died from the disease. This has been a problem in parts of Africa where burial rituals have put people in contact with infected bodies.

Ebola virus. CDC, File via Associated Press

8. Ebola likely comes from bats.


Fruit bats are believed to be the natural host of Ebola, though ultimately scientistsaren’t completely sure where the disease originated. The first patient who got Ebola in 1976 became ill after handling monkey and antelope meat. People have also become sick after handling dead animals they find in the forest.

Fruit bats are actually a common food source in Guinea. In March, the governmentbanned bat soup in an effort to fight the spread of the virus.

Children in Sierra Leone in the 1960s hold up freshly caught bats. Creative Commons / Via Flickr: gbaku

9. The epidemic is decimating social structures in the hardest-hit countries.


According to UNICEF, at least 3,700 children in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone have lost one or both parents to the disease. The brunt of the epidemic also hasfallen disproportionately on women.

Making matters worse, thousands of those who survive the disease have been rejected by their families and communities, who fear infection themselves.

A child looks at a man suspected of suffering from the Ebola virus in Monrovia on Sept. 12. AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh

10. Despite the spread of the disease outside of west Africa, experts say it is unlikely to reach epidemic proportions in the U.S.


During Tuesday’s news conference announcing the arrival of Ebola in the U.S., Frieden said there is “no doubt that we will control this importation or this case of Ebola so that it does not spread widely in this country.” To that end, the patient in Dallas has been isolated and was undergoing treatment.

The U.S. is also vastly more prepared to deal with Ebola than the countries where it has already killed hundreds or thousands. In addition to generally more developed health infrastructure, most hospital in the U.S. are equipped to deal with the disease.

11. Officials say more needs to be done to stop the disease.


The epidemic has frequently been described as “spiraling out of control” and on Sept. 25 President Obama said the world had responded to the epidemic too slowly. The slow response to the outbreak has been a recurring criticism of WHO.

In recent weeks, more aid has begun to flow to the affected region. In mid September, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation pledged $50 million to fight the disease. Obama has also pledged aid, troops and infrastructure development as part of a major international operation. In addition, the World Bank has put togethera $400 million financing package for the region.

Still, the United Nations has estimated that it needs $1 billion to respond to the Ebola epidemic.

Source: Jim Dalrymple II & Liza Tozzi for Buzzfeed News

Tagged: ebola

candiestewart:

that one friend who always outshines you in everything and you can’t say anything because everyone loves them more